Faculty Member to Judge Collegiate ECHO Competition

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Mass Communications Professor Dan Henrich will judge 25 entries in the nationwide Collegiate ECHO competition. Student teams work on these yearly challenges over the course on a year. This year’s challenge is to create an integrated marketing campaign that increases awareness and consideration of Custom Adiiences among Facebook’s target audience, B2C (Business to Consumer) marketing decision makers.

Students research and plan on how to spend a $5 million budget, delivering a final proposal, a Strategic Summary Chart and a visual summary and video presentation summarizing their campaign.

“I was the faculty advisor for several of these campaigns at Liberty University,” said Henrich, “..it is very challenging.” Henrich went on to say that his teams never placed in the national competition, but did so on the regional level. Henrich has introduced the interactive marketing communication (IMC) approach in MCM 302 Public Relations and Advertising – a course recently redesigned.

“It is clear that students need these kinds of experience to be competitive in the marketplace and to do so all colleges need to take a new look at what is needed,” Henrich said.

The Collegiate ECHO competition is sponsored by MARKETING EDGE, a non-profit solely committed to acquaint professors and college students with – and to engage and involve them in – the thriving business of marketing. Marketing EDGE is supported solely by corporations and individuals who want to give back to the community.

Henrich hopes to attend the MARKETING EDGE Professors Academy and Research Summit next Fall.

Mass Com Faculty Speaks at Communication Meeting

PDhenrich editedrofessor Dan Henrich presented a paper and chaired a session at the Florida Communication Association meeting in Orlando, Florida last week.

His paper was entered in the Competitive Professional Scholarship category and titled “Oramedia: Case Studies in Participatory Media Development.” Based on his work in Africa and India, the paper discussed the use of indigenous media in the change process. Time after time, diffusion research has shown that development communicators must understand the culture of a target people group in order to effectively persuade them to a point of decision to adopt a health innovation. Henrich’s paper session was attended by about 20 and generated discussion among peers. “This paper is an an excellent addition to the conference this years,” stated Jennifer Whalen, incoming President of the FCA and faculty of communication at University of South Florida.

Henrich also chaired a session titled “Open Forum Discussion: Are Senior Exit Exams Relevant or Necessary for Communication Students?” Participants discussed options like creative portfolio development in a capstone course reviewed by local professionals, exit exams (none of the schools used one), and exit interviews. It was clear that although major mass communication professional organizations did not suggest an exit exam the attendees did believe that a creative portfolio might increase marketability of graduating seniors

Henrich also had the opportunity to compare EWC’s Tiger Gazette to Lynn University’s 10 year old iPulse web paper and discuss ways to improve the Tiger Gazette with iPulse’s advisor Professor Stefanie Powers. Powers has agreed to provide materials she uses to training budding journalists at Lynn.

Faculty Attends Health Summit

Connect2Health2Henrich was invited after a search for informed participants. “In short, we researched around Jacksonville for people who can represent the varying dimensions and issues surrounding elderly care and health. He came to our attention as we researched academicians who may be able to bring an informed perspective to an innovative design session. In this instance, we were considering someone to augment the session and participants with their understanding of eliciting stories, and empathizing and designing for a population, which are roles intrinsic to journalism and mass communications,” said Shaikh Yahya, FCC Connect2Health member.

Henrich participated in an innovative Interactive Telehealth Session called “Broadband Bridging Gaps for Seniors and People with Disabilities.” A group of five participants were presented with a real life scenario of a senior and her health challenges. The team developed a simple skit and answers to the patient’s problems using TeleHealth methodology.

During the proceedings, Henrich had the opportunity to ask several questions as the proceedings were streamed over the internet. This engendered several face-to-face discussions with participants during lunch which included, Mignon Clyburn, FCC Commissioner, Dr. Floyd Willis and others. He also discussed communication strategies with representatives from the WellFlorida Council, HCNeNetwork, The Health Copuncil of North Florida, the director of FSCJ’s HIM & MCB Program and several IT consultants. Henrich also joined with the FCC social media consultants to post on Twitter and Linkedin. In addition, the office of Congresswoman Maxine Waters saw the live streaming and contacted Henrich. Waters is the incumbent of California’s 43rd district.

Founders Day Video Shot by Mass Comm Department

Mass Communications was entrusted to produce a video of the recent 150th Founder’s Day Convocation.

“The entire event is now posted on Youtube,” said Dan Henrich, Assistant Professor of Mass Communications.

In addition, Professor Dan Henrich shot quality stills which are located on his personal Flickr Site.

Fall 2016 and Summer Courses

 

Fall 2016 *
MCM 200 – Intro to Mass Communication – D.Henrich MWF 9-950
MCM 210 – Journalism I – TBA MWF 1-150

MCM 301 Journalism II TBA MWF 2-2:50
MCM 302 – Public Relations and Advertising I – D. Henrich MWF 10-1050
MCM 304 – History of the Black Press – P. Tahsoh TuTh 4-520
MCM 309 – Radio Production – D. Henrich TuTh 11-12:20

MCM 315 – Mass Media in Society – D.Henrich MWF 3-3:50

MCM 340 – TV Production – TBA TuTh 9:30-10:50

MCM 349 – Advanced TV Production TBA TuTh 2:30-3:50
MCM 412 – Media Law and Ethics – P. Tahsoh TuTh 1-220

SUMMER I & II

MCM 200 – Introduction to Mass Communication- R. Johnson MTWT 10:15-12:20

Note: To enroll in any of the Fall courses you must be accepted as a Mass Communications major and have passed MCM 200. There is an application form you can get from the department.

If you have taken MCM 200 as an elective you can complete all the courses required for a minor in the Fall Semester.

 

 

The Radio Industry

Here is an article from BLACK RADIO TODAY about the “state” of AM/FM radio. It is clear that being on radio is different than years ago and this article discusses the situation and opportunities. Taking EWC’s Radio classes gives you entry level skills to work in radio!
Radio DJ

Radio DJ

In 1990 The World Wide Web brought us Internet Radio. Today most of us are tuned in or tied into the Internet in one way or another. You can log in and listen to your favorite AM/FM stations website or visit a seemingly endless list of Internet radio stations. To get a better grasp on the reach of the Internet and Internet radio here are some numbers from Arbitron’s  “The Infinite Dial 2012, Navigating Digital Platforms Report” :

• There are 224 Million internet users in America
• 85% of Americans have Internet access at home
• 70% of those homes have broadband access
• Radio however still reaches 93% of homes (Approximately 241 million listeners)
• Online Radio Facts: Roughly 103 million Americans listen to online-radio monthly.
• Roughly 76 million Americans listen to on-line radio weekly.
• There has been a 30% yearly increase in on-line radio audience

When you discuss the Internet today you must also discuss Social Media. 58 Million Americans check their Social Media sites several times a day. The numbers are staggering and Internet radio is only just beginning to take advantage of those numbers.

DJ

DJ

• 56% of all Americans have a personal profile on at least one social network
• 54% of all Americans have a Facebook profile
• 13% are LinkedIn
• 10% have Twitter accounts
• 8% have Google+ which has been in business the shortest time and it’s growing rapidly

In 1990 The World Wide Web brought us Internet Radio. Today most of us are tuned in or tied into the Internet in one way or another. You can log in and listen to your favorite AM/FM stations website or visit a seemingly endless list of Internet radio stations. To get a better grasp on the reach of the Internet and Internet radio here are some numbers from Arbitron’s  “The Infinite Dial 2012, Navigating Digital Platforms Report” :

• There are 224 Million internet users in America
• 85% of Americans have Internet access at home
• 70% of those homes have broadband access
• Radio however still reaches 93% of homes (Approximately 241 million listeners)
• Online Radio Facts: Roughly 103 million Americans listen to online-radio monthly.
• Roughly 76 million Americans listen to on-line radio weekly.
• There has been a 30% yearly increase in on-line radio audience

When you discuss the Internet today you must also discuss Social Media. 58 Million Americans check their Social Media sites several times a day. The numbers are staggering and Internet radio is only just beginning to take advantage of those numbers.

• 56% of all Americans have a personal profile on at least one social network
• 54% of all Americans have a Facebook profile
• 13% are LinkedIn
• 10% have Twitter accounts
• 8% have Google+ which has been in business the shortest time and it’s growing rapidly

Radio has continued to survive and has begun to accept and take advantage of Social Media. There are some major radio companies that are making use of this new audience by adding Social Network links to their websites, establishing Facebook Fan pages, building profiles on LinkedIn and balancing numerous twitter accounts.

Keep in mind that we are talking about the ability to connect to the Internet at home. There are even more statistics to show how we access the Internet away from home on cellphones.  When you look at the Internet users and the cellphone users it might lead you to think that radio really is dying in America but that simply is not true.

DJThere is still however another Internet entity to be considered; those that still call themselves “Radio” but have found new ways to entertain you with the music you still want to hear.  These newest “Radio” entities are based on solving the biggest complaint about AM &FM radio … ” They keep playing the same thing over and over again”.  Pandora, is the oldest of the big boys in this league.  22% of Americans using Pandora listen on a monthly basis and 16% of Americans using Pandora listen weekly.  Pandora’s listener numbers increased, however some sources say that Pandora has a bad business model and is falling in the stock market.  Other music services like SiriusSlacker and Spotify and turntable.fm are coming on in the rear.  Allen Johnston, the Music Specialist posted this on the bcrtoday Facebook group:

WHO HAS THE MOST LISTENERS? YOU DO THE MATH
!

YouTube Music Videos: 384 billion

Pandora: 98 million

Spotify: 37 million

Rhapsody: 7 billion

Grooveshark: 2 billion

Regardless of the information you have read there is still a loud cry that Terrestrial Radio (AM & FM) is dead or dying.  There are so many points of view on the subject that we can’t possibly cover them all.  The biggest one is the music entertainment industry is ‘going down the drain theory”.  Jeff Leeds of the New York Times reported on the revenue loss of the Music Industry.  It’s difficult to think radio without thinking records.  For many years the two seemed to be one, tied at the hip, playing the chart game.  Radio programming caters to the record companies and the record companies need to get their records played so that you can hear them and buy them.

The base of much of this report is statistical data from Arbitron but many consider Arbitron to be one of the causes of the so-called “Death of Radio”.  In recent years Arbitron has changed how they measure markets to acquire the very statistics used for this report.  The old way was diaries and the new way is PPM or Personal People Meters. DJ Nailz answered all of our other questions and had some interesting comments about both rating methods:

We have reviewed the statistics, reviewed the historical data and introduced the new wave of what is called radio.  Radio is not dying but as Isaac Caputo and Larry Steele stated it’s just transforming and morphing into something new.  The final decision is yours to make.  BCRTODAY.COM is and always will be involved in communicating with industry professionals and students who want to follow in their footsteps.  It is our goal to educate and motivate the faculty, staff and the students of HBCU radio stations.  Allen Johnston provided another link to an article by Frank Woodworth of Music Think Tank. The article had some fantastic advice for the 2012 Graduating Class about beginning a career in the music industry.

Radio is “Alive and Well”. There are obstacles in the way but as you have seen that has always been the case. Just like the move from AM to FM, from FM to Satellite and from Satellite to the Internet, radio will make the transition and survive. Take a few minutes to turn on your local radio station. Log-in to your favorite internet radio site or catch that next satellite show and enjoy an old tradition that just gets better with time. Radio is Radio regardless of where you get it or how you get it. Simply put, Radio will continue to do business. “It’s just No Longer Business as Usual”.

 

 

Mass Communications is Growing!

The Admissions Department reports that there are over 70 incoming freshmen who have indicated an interest in becoming Mass Communication majors!

“Although we will not see these new students for at least a year due to pre-requisites, it is exciting to see the department grow,” commented Dan Henrich, Assistant Professor of Mass Communications. Students are required to complete at least 30 general education units including Eng 101, 102 and Speech before they can take Mass Comms courses.

To engage these students in their first year of classes, the department will start a Communications Club which will accept both declared majors and students who have shown an interest in becoming Mass Comm majors.

Writing and Television Production

It is essential that students leave college with basic skills in all facets of television production. Here at EWC we teach two TV production courses, MCM 340 and MCM 349. These courses are broken down as follows:

TV Director and Actress Debbie Allen

TV Director and Actress Debbie Allen

MCM 340 – TV Production. 

Student Learning Outcomes are:

  1. Produce and direct video productions with realistic understanding of resources and goals.
  2. Translate scripts into video images and television and film programs.
  3. Understand the business of broadcasting and video production.
  4. Learn and demonstrate the operation of video field and studio recording and video editing systems.

Students will do a variety of projects, including scripting, camera operation, switching, audio, direction and a single camera project that will be edited with industry standard software.

CamerablackmanMCM 349 – Advanced TV Production

The student outcomes are very similar but the student produces high value productions. We expect the student to know,  understand and use the vocabulary and have advanced writing a production skills. Although we teach scriptwriting in our TV courses students may take Writing for Radio and TV

Writer and Director Spike Lee

Writer and Director Spike Lee

MCM 330 – Writing for Radio and Television

Here are some general statements about teaching students to write for television, radio and new media.

  • Learning to write for television, radio and new media is an active process for the student.
  • Active learning does not mean simply applying pen to paper or fingers to keyboard.
  • Conducting research is a critical aspect of writing.
  • Applying, through synthesis, is a critical by-product of the writing activity.
  • Learning to write for television, radio and new media builds upon prosaic writing technique.
  • Writing for television, radio and new media is more difficult than writing print media because it involves writing action and visual stimulus.
  • When students engage the task of writing for television, radio and new media they apply their writing skill.
  • Writers improve their skill as writers by reviewing the work of others as well as their own work.
  • All of what a writer does is about guiding the interpretive experience for the audience.

 

 

Journalism Today

Journalist Mark Spain at ActionNewJax

Journalist Mark Spain at ActionNewJax

Journalism has changed massively in the last five years, not to mention the last ten or 20. Today, journalism students must be prepared for a bigger workload as well as having skills in various forms of journalism, even if they only plan on working in one particular niche. Understanding the differences in today’s journalism can help one prepare for a better and brighter career.

Journalism Rule #1 – Being Versatile

Today’s journalists must be more versatile than they were in the past. With the internet being one of the most popular ways for the public to get their news, journalists must have experience in several different areas in order to be able to satisfy the need for digital information. Just a few things a journalist might want to be proficient in that didn’t really matter in the past includes website design, photography, social media, and web page layout. These skills help journalists manage web pages, create blogs, and provide information and news via the internet – no matter what branch of journalism they’re in.

Topher Sander - Metro Writer at Times-Union

Topher Sander – Metro Writer at Times-Union

Journalism Rule #2 – Transparency

The public these days is all about transparency. If they feel that a journalist or broadcasting company is taking one side or another, they will instantly see that and call it out. Transparency, truth, details, and objectivity are extremely important in today’s journalism. While opinion journalism is still popular, the public wants to know for sure what side a journalist is on. In any case, they want to know that the journalist is reporting the facts, regardless of what side they’re on. Transparency is extremely important.

Journalism Rule #3 – Keeping Up with the Game

In the same way that journalism is so different today, it also changes week to week and month

Anchor Rob Sweeting at News4Jax WJXT

Anchor Rob Sweeting at News4Jax WJXT

to month. With the increase in technology, the demand for more transparency, and the ever-changing public, journalists must be able to weather the changes in order to be successful. For this reason, journalists have to be willing to keep up with changes in the industry and in turn, provide the public with what they’re looking for. Without this, it’s easy for even the most experienced and successful journalist to go off the radar when it comes to importance and popularity.

The journalist who understands the need for more knowledge and many more skill sets, who is honest and transparent in their search for the truth, and who keeps up with the constant changes in the industry will surely experience success on his or her path. Those who are unwilling to see journalism as a very different ball game today may not be quite as successful.

By Kristi Carter in https://suite.io/kristi-carter/4bzk24m

What do I learn in PR and Advertising?

Major Concepts and Elements taught in MCM 302 – Public Relations and Advertising I

Learn how to manage events

Learn how to manage events

Public relations is the management function that establishes and maintains mutually beneficial relationships between an organization and the publics on whom its success or failure depends.

Marketing is the management function that identifies human needs and wants, offers products and services to satisfy those demands, and causes transactions that deliver products and services in exchange for something of value to the provider.

Employee Communication/Internal relations is the specialized part of public relations that builds and maintains mutually beneficial relationships between managers and the employees on whom an organization’s success depends.

2013-11-12 08.46.03Publicity is information provided by an outside source that is used by the media because the information has news value. It is an uncontrolled method of placing messages in the media because the source does not pay the media for placement.

Advertising is information placed in the media by an identified sponsor that pays for the time or space. It is a controlled method of placing messages in the media.

Press agentry is creating newsworthy stories and events to attract media attention and to gain public notice.

Public affairs is the specialized part of public relations that builds and maintains organizational relationships with governmental agencies and community stakeholder groups in order to influence public policy.

Lobbying is the specialized part of public relations that builds and maintains relations with government, primarily to influence legislation and regulation.

Issues management is the process of anticipating, identifying, evaluating, and responding to issues and trends that affect an organization’s relationships with its publics.

Promote the "brand" of the school

Promote the “brand” of the school

Crisis management is the public relations specialty that helps organizations strategically respond to negative situations and to dialog with stakeholders affected by perceived and actual consequences of crises.

Investor relations is the specialized part of corporate public relations that builds and maintains mutually beneficial relationships with shareholders and others in the financial community to maximize market value.

Development is the specialized part of public relations in nonprofit organizations that builds and maintains relationships with donors, volunteers, and members to secure financial and volunteer support.

All effective organizations strive to establish and maintain relationships with those identified as important to organizational survival and growth.

The social function of public relations is to facilitate adjustment and maintenance in the social systems that provide us with our physical and social needs.